About your Search

20131028
20131105
STATION
CNNW 21
MSNBC 4
MSNBCW 4
LANGUAGE
English 39
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
, edward snowden manifest tow of truth is what he is calling it. he is ghademanding the u.s. dro espionage charges against him and why he is suggesting he is is not criminal. >>> a bizarre security breach at o'hare airport. an alligator on the loose in terminal 3! what? wait, wait, wait... no, no, no, wait, wait. (baby crying) so you can deposit a check... with the touch of a finger. so you can arrange a transfer in the blink of an eye. so you can help make a bond... i got it. that lasts a lifetime. the chase mobile app. so you can. ♪ hey lady! noooo! no! [ tires screech ] ♪ nooo! nooo! nooo! hey lady, that's diesel! i know. ♪ ♪ okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash.
think on this debate? i feel like if edward snowden lost sean penn, he has to many can be hasn't lost me. >> any concerns? >> i don't know what's in his mind. i don't know what he's doing now. he might be in a hot tub with two russian strippers named i want to drink a lot. he's done some service, getting us to at least debate the issue and as far as stuff gone on the last week or so with the european allies being up sit, i can understand if they felt their personal cell phones were being tapped. but on the other hand, they should really climb a little bit. it's been 60, 70 years since america defended allies, especially in europe. we liberated europe twice in the last century. they never wanted to pay the premiums for being protected. cut us a little slack when we protect you. the 9/11 plot was hatched in germany. there are much more restive muslim populations on the european continent than here. we over do it all. there is no doubt about that. cut us slack for the protection we've given you-all this time. >> that could be an endorsement of what the nsa has been doing and what you said a
. >>> coming up on "new day," a few proceed from edward snowden. he says he's no criminal. wait until you hear our response from the leaders in the nation's capitol. he says he is sorry for past mistakes for smoking co-cable. he will not resign and he wants the public to see the alleged evidence. t thing i need. seriously? let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of the good 'ol midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! i really didn't think this through. brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) hall we do is go out to dinner.? that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...what? he's using you. he probably has a citi thankyou card and gets 2x the points at restaurants. so he's just racking up points with me. some people... ugh! no, i've got it. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back, which is deposited in your fidelity account. is that it? actually... there's no annual fee and no l
recently of a man looking like edward snowden doing his grocery shopping and now it seems he's got himself a normal job. but it's likely given the fact that he's an i.t. specialist he's not going to be sitting in some big room with a load of other techies, he's probably going to do it remotely. there are security concerns around him, so he's probably not going to be very clear or very public about where he's working from. >> it sounds like he's going to stay in russia, forever i mean. it's starting to sound more like that at least. >> well, his father, lawrence snowden, came to visit him a few weeks back and said he was doing very well in russia, he was grateful to the russian authorities for having granted him asylum that he felt he could lead a normal life here and that he was able to find a job here, and there have been a lot of companies who have been public about the fact that they've been looking to recruit edward snowden. he's obviously a name that you would want to have up there on your text specitech specialist and the russian version of facebook tried to recruit him earlier on. t
these stories when they come out, what does this new revelation from edward snowden from nsa reveal what the agency has been up to. >> the way that you just introduced that is crucial, right? because virtually every one of these stories, the day that it comes out, everybody pulls out their hair, runs around, i can't believe this is happening. this is crazy and then quietly over the next couple days we get revisions to the story. sometimes we get wholesale rewrites of the story and they don't appear to be anything like what they whrp they were first broken. we did that with the story we discussed here on the panel one night when it came out "the washington post" broke the story originally and then it had to be basically rewritten a couple days later. we have seen the same thing with the stories about the united states vacuuming up virtually every phone call across europe turns out that wasn't true. partners in europe were involved in that turns out they probably about most of the vacuuming for us. i'm reluctant to offer any kind of definitive take on what this means until we know that it
.s. surveillance abroad. the material handed over to a reporter by nsa leaker edward snowden and it's providing a seemingly endless stream of revelations. those revelations are rocking america's relationships with some of its closest allies. christiane amanpour is joining us right now. you just spoke to the reporter who has been breaking all of these edward snowden leaks. what did he just tell you? >> reporter: well, first of all, they have thousands and thousands of documents but also, that he just simply rejects what, for instance, mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, british prime minister david cameron, many, many u.s. and other allied officials are saying, which is that this is dangerous, what they're doing, that they are putting all sorts of people at risk, they are compromising all sorts of abilities to close down terrorist cells and plots and this and that. he rejects that and always has. this is what he said to me on that. >> every terrorist who is capable of tying their own shoes has long known that the u.s. government and the uk government are trying to monitor
police went to his house by missed him by a matter of minutes. >>> plus edward snowden says the united states should cut him some slack. the white house says, think again. >>> and a scary moment during the texans colts game last night. >> year all very worried. we went back out. they told us that he was -- he was all right. he was stable. >> houston os head coach gary kubiak collapses on the field at halftime. what could have happened? "newsroom" continues now. >>> good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining me. we have a better idea of just how -- of how -- just how troubled the l.a.x. shooting suspect paul ciancia was days before his deadly rampage. today he's in critical condition and unable to speak to investigators. but a woman who knows him and his roommates spoke exclusively to cnn. she said he and to be unraveling the days before the shooting and he was already making plans. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he was going back home. either that his dad was sick nsd had to deal with family is
: the newest edward snowden documents report more spying on america's closest allies. in spain the nsa reports listening in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany a newspaper reports that president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on german chance large angela merkel's calls back in 2010 and contradicting white house assurances that the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report saying the following. nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving merkel. the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness, up to now, only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i i can tell you that the president assured chancellor that the united states has not monitored and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence experts are supposed to come to the united states to challenge their counterparts on the spying after a german official accused the u.s. of breaking german law on german soil but mike rogers defended the nsa surveillance on cnn sund
, that includes many that showed over the weekend protesting the nsa and some supporting edward snowden here. this has broadened out and one of the big questions remains today, what information was provided to the president, particularly adds it relates to spying on our allies in the collection of data in that form. >> we don't know what kind of information the administration has. we heard them say they didn't have that information. dianne feinstein wasn't aware of the program. that is an interesting question. either way, it presents problems for the administration if they did know about it, why was that continued to allowed to go forward. if it didn't know about it, why is it oversight of these programs. >> let me play what adam schiff said. >> absolutely believe that the program in its current form for end and be restructured because we can get all of the same information to protect the country that we need to without getting this wealth of data. and all programs should be constitutional, effective and should be structured in a way to minimize any unnecessary intrusion on our privacy. >> w
released by edward snowden and said a few things about it. one, not the nsa listening in on this call data. it was the nsa, the u.s. and all of its nato partners. the cold data had nothing do with the spanish and french but a collection of call data listen -- listen to it in a number of countries in support of military operations. he said it is completely false. one, this was the msa doing this and, two, it was european citizens, french, and spanish citizens that were being listened to. pretty aggressive knockdown of that story and some of the source of some of the greatest criticism from european side of nsa surveillance. >> jim, part of the white house pushback has been everybody does it. clapper also saying that foreign countries also spy on the u.s. so -- looking at that further, is it possible that the president's blackberry is being read by the germans or the british? >> i asked this of a former official yesterday. i was being -- he said, sure. they probably go after it. i don't know if they would have success. nsa has advantages. but one of the points that mike rogers made in this h
the leaker. >> edward snowden being the leaker. we were talking about domestic spying and snooping on americans. here you have purely foreign intelligence and suddenly that's a crime as well. it's kind of an indication of the moving goalpost. >> domestically the political back lash. there are -- >> against the nsa -- >> there's sensenbrenner in the house -- >> especially when there's legislation to stop the nsa from data collection, let the aclu basically argue why certain things shouldn't be done. and to really handcuff our intelligence services the way that it happened in the 1970s, which indirectly led up to our failures that led to 9/11. >> how big a danger is that, mary? >> well, it's, i think it's possible that, you know, you're going to get some momentum. but it's incredibly naive. i mean, you know, is this -- if the u.s. stops doing this, then it woen be happening anymore. basically if the u.s. stops doing it then the only ones doing it will be the chinese, the russians, you know, the brazilians, the cubans. and probably the germans and the french. you know, the idea that b
closest allies. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. spain reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month. in germany, the newspaper records, president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn general sander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving murkle. the nsa says the willingness up to now to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president can assure the chancellor, the sungs not and will not 3407b tore the conversations of the chancellor. >> reporter: they are coming to the u.s. to challenge their american counterparts, after breaking quote german law on german soil. house chairman rodgers defended the nsa under surveillance on cnn sunday saying it was both well regulated and essential to keeping both americans and europeans safe from terrorism. >> i think the biggest
long that the people don't know what to believe. brian todd, cnn, washington. >>> edward snowden's attorney saying snowden is starting a job today working at a major undisclosed russian website. the 30-year-old is wanted here in the united states on charges of espionage and theft of government property. russia granted snowden asylum earlier this year. >>> the policy is constitutional and removing a judge from a case. three-judge appellate panel ruling the lower court decision appeared to be bias. critics say the stop and frisk law amounts to racial profiling. city official insist the practice has cut crime. >> probably the lowest it's been in -- since in october 31st in perhaps the 1940s so that is how safe the city is. our tactics and strategies i think have worked and continue to work. >> other appeals to stop and frisk are still pending. >>> another big legal decision to tell you about. most of texas tough abortion restrictions struck down this week have been reinstated now by a federal appeals court. under the law abortion doctors must have admitting privileges at a nearby ho
methods we collect intelligence. >> what do you think about edward snowden? is he a genuine whistle-blower, a traitor, a bit of both? >> in effect, i think that -- well, a legitimate whistle-blower is one who is the curator of the information that they're distributing. i didn't feel that that was the case with manning. and i don't think that that is the case with snowden. i did feel that was the case with daniel ellsburgh. i think that we will find forgiveness in our justice system and in our hearts when somebody has called foul on crimes -- by our government against our people. or against other governments or people. but what has become a kind -- the whistle-blower term is being associated with a blitz of information, based on the kind of -- the narcissism of the so-called whistle-blower. has there been a lot of good stuff that came out of the wikileaks? yes, it did. did we know that many people whose lives were put in jeopardy for that, people who fight very hard for this country? yes, we do. and certainly, diplomacy has fallen under enormous attack. so i encourage the whistle-blo
operates outside of the country. >> this move comes after nsa leaker edward snowden indicated the u.s. was eavesdropping on german chancellor angela merkel and 34 other foreign leaders. dozens of pages of top secret u.s. documents were declassified on monday. in an parent bid to show the nsa was acting legally when it gathered millions of americans phone record. >>> the obama administration is granting a six-week extension to americans who want to sign. for obama care coverage. the new deadline is march 13st and extended because the website has a number of problems. we are told the website is back up and running now. >>> when it comes to terrorism the future looks frightening. cnn obtaining a sobering new report that reveals casualty and attacks are on the rise. as chris lawrence reports, there is no end in sight to that troubling trend. >> reporter: it's not your imagination. terrorists are launching more attacks like this deadly assault on a nairobi mall. and it's likely the world will see even more violence next year. cnn obtained exclusive access to an upcoming report from stark
on to say that media outlets have misinterpreted documents that were leaked by edward snowden. and much of the data from europe was collected by intelligence agencies of our allies. they collected the phone records said general alexander and shared them with the u.s. >>> u.s. special forces reveal they were just hours from embarking on a dangerous covert operation earlier this month to capture a major benghazi terror suspect. special forces were ready if ordered to capture ahmed abu khattala. the mission never materialized. partly because there was so much publicity inside libya and the western press about another raid in libya just hours later. that raid led to the capture of suspected al qaeda operative abu anas al libi in tripoli. and he's in u.s. soil. >>> maliki will meet with president obama on friday. he is asking the u.s. for more counterterrorism aid and he'll also discuss purchasing american-made apache highlights and other equipment. senate leaders are warning that maliki is leading america back to civil war and he's who tao receptive to the influence of iraq and iran. >>> bo
with edward snowden months ago, they start eed to b very upset in germany, partly because of their history with the secret police, and partly because they thought this president would be different. they thought president obama would do some different in national security than president bush. that's colored their opinion. as former secretary of state madeleine albright has said, everybody does it, i was even bugged by the french when i was u.s. ambassador to the u.n. >> julian, should he have known if the nsa was tapping a personal cell phone of a world leader? >> certainly, the president doesn't know everything going on with the nsa, and we shouldn't expect that. but when you're talking about the surveillance of world leaders and an issue that's been controversial for a while now, you would expect that there's some knowledge, eerlth by the president or people surrounding him. he hasn't said much about the second part of that, but i do think they're surprised that this was off the radar in the inner circles of the white house. >> christiane, you point out spying, one of the world's oldest p
a literal run in with a camera. >> usa today, edward snowden has a new job working for a russian website. it starts earlier this month. they didn't name the company for security reasons. "the washington post," employees of the department of homeland security may have boosted their pay with overtime they didn't earn. with o.t., it's $8.7 million a year. this tactic could add money to a paycheck and used to recruit new workers. >>> san diego union tribune, a police officer issued what many believe is the first ticket for driving while wearing google glass. oh, my god. this woman was caught after being caught for speeding. she plans to fight the ticket. it was blocking her vision and causing a distraction. >>> from "the washington post," the moment air travelers have been waiting for. as long as they don't allow talking on phones. >> what? >> the faa finally agreed to let passengers use electronic devices like tablets and phones throughout flights. >> oh, my gosh. >> reporter: on this halloween travel day with costumes on full display at the airport, there was a treat awaiting travelers. >>
the firm whose background checks helped nsa leaker edward snowden and aaron alexis get clearances. they are accused of failing to perform quality control reviews in its investigations of potential government workers. >>> check out the white house. it's getting beautified or boo-tified for halloween. lit up in orange and purple lights. decorated with jack-o'-lanterns and cobwebs. imagine if the white house is in your neighborhood. what are we going to get? >> a long security line. >> that's true. >>> coming up on "new day," we heard the apologies from kathleen sebelius, the vice president. why? obvious, the obama care website. they're pledging to get it fixed. the question, is that enough. >>> and the startling new accusation against the nsa. the agency says it was not peering into yahoo! and google databases. what it is not denying is raising more questions. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses
-mails and facebook posts at the end of the show. >>> meantime, the hits from fugitive leaker edward snowden keep oncoming, leaving the white house in damage control. the obama administration sending off reports now that president obama knew that the nsa was eavesdropping on german chancellor angela merkel's personal phone calls. this as we hear of another bombshell. the nsa reportedly monitored 60 million phone calls made in spain in just a single month. here's jay carney just a few moments ago talking about that scandal. >> was the president kept out of the loop about what the nsa was doing? >> josh, what i can tell you is two things.ibz first, i'm not going to get into details of internal discussions. but the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can, we do not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. today's world is highly interconnected. and the flow of large amounts of data is unprecedented. innovation is going to continue. if we're going to keep our citizens and our allies safe, we have to continue to stay ah
classified information from ex-nsa employee edward snowden. added if they don't stop doing so "it will be very difficult for government to stand back and not to act." bret. >> james, thank you. >>> answers are still hard to come by in the investigation into last fall's benghazi terror assault. last night one of journalisms heavy hitter confirms what we knew and had reported on. correspondent add day housely has the latest from los angeles. >> reporter: it's been more than a year since the attacks on benghazi and still information provided by the state department, military, cia and the white house has been incomplete, contradictory and fails to answer many questions. >> a lot of responsibility, a lot of ownous that needs to be taken up and accounted for. >> reporter: but accounts have been tough to come by. as witnesses claim they've been threatened and in some cases forced to sign nondisclosure agreements. fox spoke last may with an american special operator who witnessed the attack. >> i don't blame -- you know, it's something that's a risky especially in our profession to say an
surveillance on our own allies. some of the documents posted by or leaked by edward snowden to the media indicate that these programs started in 2002. why spy on an ally? >> jake, if there were such a program, it would be classified and i couldn't talk about it. it would be totally inappropriate, and i haven't been in the loop now obviously for more than four years. so it's just one of those subjects i couldn't discuss. >> without getting specific, on a theoretical basis, what is the interest of the united states in conducting surveillance on a country who is a clear ally of the united states? >> i've got to go with the answer i have given you. let me say this. we do have a fantastic intelligence capability worldwide against all kinds of potential issues and concerns. we are vulnerable, as was shown on 9/11, and you never know what you're going to need when you need it. the fact is, we do collect a lot of intelligence and without speaking about any particular target or group of targets, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, through our conduct of fore
allies until edward snowden leaked details, his aides can't publicly confirm intelligence details but they do say it's not going on anymore. >> we do not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> reporter: they also say obama's critics are making a single asujs from a number of unrelated incidents. >> the president appears to be in the dark about some pretty significant stories that are swirling around this white house. >> republican critics say a lot of things. >> reporter: actually, so do the president's friends. >> what else has the president not been told? >> well, basically all the bad stuff. >> reporter: aides say the president was caught off guard when the government shutdown froze death benefits to the families of servicemen and women. the republican national committee now calls mr. obama the bystander president. an oklahoma senator says one result of that is no one's held responsible for failures like the botched launch of the obama care website. >> what one individual was responsible for putting this together or saying time-out, we're not ready? >> reporte
the obama white house has been dealing not only with the website crash but also a new offering from edward snowden. a major spanish newspaper reporting today that the american spy agency may have been listening to at least 60 million phone calls in spain. this week two representatives from german chancellor angela merkel will visit washington. their leader is calling for talks about the nsa's reach after reports she was too big brothered by uncle sam. >> clearly damage has been done. i think we have to evaluate whether the costs of the method of gathering some intelligence greatly exceeds the benefit of that intelligence. >> joining me right now is north carolina republican congresswoman renee ellmers, a member of the house and energy commerce committee which is overseeing hearings on capitol hill into the federal health care website. congresswoman, it's great to have you with me. you had your chance to speak to the contractors last week and we have kathleen sebelius in the hot seat this week. what are the first questions that you want to ask of the secretary? >> well, what i'd like to kno
, but cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto has more. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. in spain, reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany the "sontag" newspaper reports president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls back in 2010, contradicting white house assurances the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn "general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel." the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness up to now only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence officials are expected to come to the u.s.
. of course putin is more powerful than obama. martha: you know, we learned edward snowden was given a tech job in russia. he was clearly protected by the russian government when we asked in no uncertain terms he please be sent back because of the nsa infractions. that was basically thrown back in our face. you look at the relationship has deteriorated to some extent with israel. you look at our relationship with saudi arabia which is not in any way what it once was on the world stage. and it raises a lot of these questions and, dick cheney, i know it is not going to come as a surprise to anybody he feels this way, but he spoke out about this earlier this week and i want to play that for you. >> if we had a presence over there, if we had been able to continue the policies that we put in place, if we had been able to work to keep governments, establish government that is are stable, willing to defend their own sovereign turf we would be much better off. now we're in a position where our adversaries no longer fear us and our allies no longer trust us. martha: jemu, what do you think about tha
calls and showed them how the report got it wrong. showed then the slide that edward snowden had released and said this is not true. and by and large talking to the members, they found the explanation satisfying. alexander also told them that when the nsa collects data in europe, they do it in collaboration with european intelligence agency. so i said is it hypocritical for you to be krit sicriticizing th when you're participating. >> we want to get to the truth. there are a set of allegations -- >> by americans and europeans? >> whoever it was, whatever partnerships it may have been, whoever it was, we want to get to the truth of it. >> so in effect they're angry at both sides. they're demanding answers from the u.s. and european governments to find out why mass surveillance is happening and to what extent. >> you're getting statements from yahoo! and google, right? >> that's right. this is in response to the "washington post" story about accessing communications links between their servers. this is from google, we have long been concerned about the possibility of this kind of s
a good point. senator dianne feinstein, pointing out that edward snowden wants the charges against against him dropped entirely and why he says that his actions are justifiable. martha: speak to any woman goes up in flames while pumping gas. we will study what happens when we come back. energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. take beano before what does that first spoonful taste likok. honey bunches of oats. ching! mmmm! mmmm! mmmm! wow! it's the oats. honey. yeah. honey bunches of oats. this is a great cereal. bill: edwards noted in saying that it shows that he was justifi
. edward snowden wrote an open letter published in a german magazine. he calls it manifesto for truth. jim scuitto, what does he include? >> he tries to make the case that he's not a spy, but a whistle-blower on what he calls the global problem of mass surveillance. in this her he calls the u.s. and britain the worst offenders, and condemns them. the debate he says, quote, they wanted to avoid is now taking place in countries around the world, he wrote, instead of causes damage, the use is causing society to push for political reforms, oversight and new laws. >> i spoke to a senior state department official about this, is snowden had a legal means. he could have pursued it in the nsa, taken it up to the inspector general. if that wasn't good enough, he could have gone to court. in fact he's saying he could come back and face the charge in course. that's the legal way to pursue his case. his position, of course, is he won't get a fair trial here. >> the whole issue of u.s./iranian relations. today we saw a huge demonstration marking the 23rd anniversary of the takeover of the -- what does t
is for david ignatius for sure. new reporting confirms what edward snowden leaked last week that the scope extends to some of america's closest allies abroad. the "wall street journal" reports that the national security agency ended a program that spied on as many as 35 world leaders after the white house ordered a review over the summer. officials say several programs have been shut down and others are expected to be close to the later date. the report states president obama spent nearly five years in office in the dark. unaware of the nsa's practices overseas. the targets of the programs are not decided by the president, but by the agency. yesterday congressman peter king defended the program saying they should be viewed as a positive thing for everyone involved. >> i think the president should stop apologizing and being defensive. the nsa saved thousands of lives not just in the united states, but in france and germany and throughout europe. we are not doing this for the fun of it, but to gather intelligence that helps not just us. >> there reports out of germany that the president did
spies here. the problem is you can't get caught. somewhere in russia edward snowden is smiling right now, coming up in congressional testimony like we've heard. so this has really thrown off the -- thrown the white house off balance. at first, the president was saying the nsa is not spying on americans. now they've have to deal with spying on foreign leaders. that's been the big problem. >> okay. bob cusack, thank you very much. coming up next, the cnn film "blackfish" has sparked a nationwide debate over what should be done with killer whales in captivity. there's been a huge push to set the whales free. the big question is, once the whales are released back into the ocean, what happens next? we investigate that after the break. it's a growing trend in business: do more with less with less energy. hp is helping ups do just that. soon, the world's most intelligent servers, designed by hp, will give ups over twice the performance, using forty percent less energy. multiply that across over a thousand locations, and they'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. t
't know about it until nsa leaker edward snowden revealed the u.s. was spying on other allies including leaders of mexico and brazil. the president says just because the nation's spy agencies are able to listen in on phone conversations doesn't necessarily mean they should. >> we give them policy direction but what we've seen over the last several years is their capacities continue to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> reporter: the state department says the nsa spying disclosures have raised what they call a spokeswoman called significant challenges in some of these country's most important relationships and partnerships. brazil's president canceled a state visit over the snooping. jenna? jenna: worth pointing out editorial pages for conserve-leaning, liberal-leaning writers taken issue with this. some president's critics calling him the bystander president. why is that? >> reporter: the republican national committee strung together a group of problems that seemed to h
stems from edward snowden and all of these documents. there is another one out this morning that suggests that the u.s. was listening into some 60 million calls in spain over a year. so you have real problems diplomatically from this. >> it's unbelievable, too. like the peter king method of embracing it. it's called a hamburg cell, we need to embrace it and listening in. >> listen to them, don't listen to us. >> he said stop apologizing for this. >> have a great program, bret baier's program runs at 6:00 o'clock eastern time right here on the fox news channel. we're all big fans of that. >> have a good day. >> now for the rest of headline, we'll go to heather nauert. >> good morning to you. it looks like such a beautiful day in washington, d.c michael jackson's former doctor walking free. conrad murray was released from an l.a. county jail at midnight. this video shows him driving away inside of a cop car. murray served just two years of his four-year prison sentence for giving jackson a deadly dose of propothol. what's raising eyebrows, murray says he's planning to try to g
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)